Submission Documents: Motion by Councillor Jill Pidgeon:- "Council notes the information received by the Glasgow Disability Alliance and Scottish Women's Budget Group is startling. Glasgow Disability Alliance in their Triple Whammy report showed that 'For disabled women, the inequality, exclusion, and discrimination already faced as a disabled person, and as a woman, have been triple-charged by the unequal impacts of Covid-19. The Scottish Women's Budget Group have worked with members of Glasgow Disability Alliance to use gender budgeting tools to look at how these structural inequalities impact disabled women, how the current cost of living crisis is exacerbating theses inequalities and how the actions taken to address the crisis are impacting. The report states that that disabled women continue to feel the strain of the situation created by the pandemic while simultaneously experiencing the unequal impact of the cost-of-living crisis. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation (April 2023): highlights that single people without children are over-represented in households in the deepest poverty. This briefing also evidences that disabled people are one of the groups at risk of very deep poverty. This research can be compared to wider SWBG research shows that in all areas disabled women disclosed that they are struggling to manage basic living costs including, food, transport, and energy costs. Disabled women said they are struggling at higher levels because they often had higher day to day costs as a result of being disabled or having an impairment or long-term health conditions. The financial support provided by all levels of government has failed to take into account the additional costs that disabled people have and as a result larger numbers of disabled women are struggling to manage their costs and are having to utilise strategies to manage these impacts negatively on their health, wellbeing and life chances. Disabled women are telling us that the impact of these strategies is having a negative impact on their standard of living with many saying they are barely surviving and that their lives have shrunk. Disabled women are saying they cannot participate in their own lives; contribute to their families and communities; or take up opportunities available to them. Disabled women are telling us that the decisions taken by the UK & Scottish Government, the Health & Social Care Partnership, Glasgow City Council, Glasgow and Clyde Health Board and Housing Associations have all negatively impacted on their lives, all exacerbating the inequalities experienced prior to the covid-19 and now the cost-of-living crises. Decisions about increasing charges for services and decisions to reduce services or not returning services to pre-pandemic levels have all failed to identify the negative impact faced by disabled women and take actions to mitigate the impact on this already disadvantaged group. Therefore, Council agrees to support the Disability Alliances recommendations and agrees to a cross party working group to address the serious concerns of disabled women in Glasgow. Based on the information gathered we are calling on the Scottish Government, Glasgow City Council and Glasgow Health and Social Care Partnership to: 1. Increase the use of intersectional gender budget analysis on decisions at national and local level. 2. Carry out an analysis of the impact of decisions to increase charges for care related costs and identifying what actions can be taken to mitigate any negative impacts. 3. Break free from silo thinking and silo working: "policy coherence" requiring planners, policy makers and service designers to have a good understanding and analysis of the interrelated barriers which disabled women experience. 4. Work with DPOs to co-design Disability Poverty Reduction Actions such as free bus pass, blue badges, taxi card scheme, and fuel poverty measures and plan strategic actions to address the specific causes and impacts of poverty on disabled women, e.g. accessible employability, fair work and more adequate disability benefits. 5. Take into account the additional costs faced by disabled women when designing cost of living support schemes: this will necessarily require an increased understanding of the inequalities and barriers faced by disabled women." Help Icon

This is the list of documents available for the submission Motion by Councillor Jill Pidgeon:- "Council notes the information received by the Glasgow Disability Alliance and Scottish Women's Budget Group is startling. Glasgow Disability Alliance in their Triple Whammy report showed that 'For disabled women, the inequality, exclusion, and discrimination already faced as a disabled person, and as a woman, have been triple-charged by the unequal impacts of Covid-19. The Scottish Women's Budget Group have worked with members of Glasgow Disability Alliance to use gender budgeting tools to look at how these structural inequalities impact disabled women, how the current cost of living crisis is exacerbating theses inequalities and how the actions taken to address the crisis are impacting. The report states that that disabled women continue to feel the strain of the situation created by the pandemic while simultaneously experiencing the unequal impact of the cost-of-living crisis. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation (April 2023): highlights that single people without children are over-represented in households in the deepest poverty. This briefing also evidences that disabled people are one of the groups at risk of very deep poverty. This research can be compared to wider SWBG research shows that in all areas disabled women disclosed that they are struggling to manage basic living costs including, food, transport, and energy costs. Disabled women said they are struggling at higher levels because they often had higher day to day costs as a result of being disabled or having an impairment or long-term health conditions. The financial support provided by all levels of government has failed to take into account the additional costs that disabled people have and as a result larger numbers of disabled women are struggling to manage their costs and are having to utilise strategies to manage these impacts negatively on their health, wellbeing and life chances. Disabled women are telling us that the impact of these strategies is having a negative impact on their standard of living with many saying they are barely surviving and that their lives have shrunk. Disabled women are saying they cannot participate in their own lives; contribute to their families and communities; or take up opportunities available to them. Disabled women are telling us that the decisions taken by the UK & Scottish Government, the Health & Social Care Partnership, Glasgow City Council, Glasgow and Clyde Health Board and Housing Associations have all negatively impacted on their lives, all exacerbating the inequalities experienced prior to the covid-19 and now the cost-of-living crises. Decisions about increasing charges for services and decisions to reduce services or not returning services to pre-pandemic levels have all failed to identify the negative impact faced by disabled women and take actions to mitigate the impact on this already disadvantaged group. Therefore, Council agrees to support the Disability Alliances recommendations and agrees to a cross party working group to address the serious concerns of disabled women in Glasgow. Based on the information gathered we are calling on the Scottish Government, Glasgow City Council and Glasgow Health and Social Care Partnership to: 1. Increase the use of intersectional gender budget analysis on decisions at national and local level. 2. Carry out an analysis of the impact of decisions to increase charges for care related costs and identifying what actions can be taken to mitigate any negative impacts. 3. Break free from silo thinking and silo working: "policy coherence" requiring planners, policy makers and service designers to have a good understanding and analysis of the interrelated barriers which disabled women experience. 4. Work with DPOs to co-design Disability Poverty Reduction Actions such as free bus pass, blue badges, taxi card scheme, and fuel poverty measures and plan strategic actions to address the specific causes and impacts of poverty on disabled women, e.g. accessible employability, fair work and more adequate disability benefits. 5. Take into account the additional costs faced by disabled women when designing cost of living support schemes: this will necessarily require an increased understanding of the inequalities and barriers faced by disabled women." .

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Item Minute - 07 December 2023 Minute Public Open Document in PDF Format
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